HOSPITALITY
 
IP Communications
  • Reduces telecommunication bills and the need to invest in dedicated telephony lines.
  • Simplifies changes in line with business growth, office consolidation and team restructuring.
  • Enables the adoption of rich collaboration tools that drive greater innovation, agility and productivity.
  • Facilitates flexible and remote working thereby reducing the need for dedicated office space for every employee.
Video Conferencing
  • Reduces the need for business travel and associated expenses and carbon emissions.
  • Supports flexible working practices and facilitates faster decision-making.
  • Engages customers and staff and helps drive innovation, growth and revenue generation.
  • Minimize the risk of business disruption due to adverse weather conditions or emergencies.
Corporate Collaboration
  • Improves knowledge sharing and peer-to-peer networking.
  • Enables faster and smarter decision-making.
  • Unites distributed teams resulting in greater productivity.
  • Accelerates time-to-market for new business initiatives and product launches.
  • Minimizes travel requirements, costs and environmental impact.
  • Reduces costs as the need for telephony decreases.
  • Increases staff satisfaction and retention.
AUTOMATION
HOME AUTOMATION
  • What is Home Automation?

    Home Automation enables the automatic control of commonly used elements such as lighting, security, temperature, music and other home devices in a manner that is personalized to the needs of each family. Automated homes are referred to as "Smart Homes". Following are the benefits of home automation.

  • Convenience

    An automated home is about the convenience of saving your time and effort by having your home automatically do routine functions such as watering your grass (but only if it has not rained recently), or turning off all lights, setting the thermostat to economy mode and arming the security system when you retire for the night. It's about enjoying home theater time by having the lights dim, curtains close, TV and DVD player turn on and popcorn popper start... all with the touch of just one button.

  • Security

    Home automation is about the security you have knowing that you can look in on your home remotely from anywhere in the world, or that your home will phone you if anything is amiss, or that a fire will alert your home to wake you, shut down the gas and ventilation system and turn on a lighting path for your escape.

  • Savings

    And it's about the energy savings you will enjoy by assigning your home the responsibility of regulating the operation of lights, water heater, HVAC system, entertainment components, appliances and irrigation system so these devices are on only when needed. The benefits of an automated home are only limited by your imagination.

LIGHTING AUTOMATION

Lighting Automation Benefits

A lighting control system enables one-touch control of all lights throughout the house using which mood-based scenes can be created resulting in convenience and elegance. With the touch of a button, you can turn lights on or off, dim lights, control fans and more from anywhere in the house.

Lighting control systems can be programmed easily based on time of day, motion, security, mood, and many other factors. For example, with a lighting control system you can program your lights to automatically turn on when you enter the house or turn off during nights or when you leave the house. You can program lighting scenes consistent with a relaxing evening, a late night party or a holiday dinner. Lighting control systems do not take away from your ability to control individual lights the way you have always done.

ACCESS CONTROL

When a credential is presented to a reader, the reader sends the credential's information, usually a number, to a control panel, a highly reliable processor. The control panel compares the credential's number to an access control list, grants or denies the presented request, and sends a transaction log to a database. When access is denied based on the access control list, the door remains locked. If there is a match between the credential and the access control list, the control panel operates a relay that in turn unlocks the door. The control panel also ignores a door open signal to prevent an alarm. Often the reader provides feedback, such as a flashing red LED for an access denied and a flashing green LED for an access granted.

The above description illustrates a single factor transaction. Credentials can be passed around, thus subverting the access control list. For example, Alice has access rights to the server room, but Bob does not. Alice either gives Bob her credential, or Bob takes it; he now has access to the server room. To prevent this, two-factor authentication can be used. In a two factor transaction, the presented credential and a second factor are needed for access to be granted; another factor can be a PIN, a second credential, operator intervention, or a biometric input.

There are three types (factors) of authenticating information:

  • Something the user knows, e.g. a password, pass-phrase or PIN
  • Something the user has, such as smart card or a key fob
  • Something the user is, such as fingerprint, verified by biometric measurement

Passwords are a common means of verifying a user's identity before access is given to information systems. In addition, a fourth factor of authentication is now recognized: someone you know, whereby another person who knows you can provide a human element of authentication in situations where systems have been set up to allow for such scenarios. For example, a user may have their password, but have forgotten their smart card. In such a scenario, if the user is known to designated cohorts, the cohorts may provide their smart card and password, in combination with the extant factor of the user in question, and thus provide two factors for the user with the missing credential, giving three factors overall to allow access.

IBMS (Integrated Building Management System)
BMS (Building Management System)

Building Management Systems are most commonly implemented in large projects with extensive mechanical, HVAC, electrical, and plumbing systems. Systems linked to a BMS typically represent 40% of a building's energy usage; if lighting is included, this number approaches 70%. BMS systems are a critical component to managing energy demand. Improperly configured BMS systems are believed to account for 20% of building energy usage, or approximately 8% of total energy usage in the United States.

In addition to controlling the building's internal environment, BMS systems are sometimes linked to access control (turnstiles and access doors controlling who is allowed access and egress to the building) or other security systems such as closed-circuit television (CCTV) and motion detectors. Fire alarm systems and elevators are also sometimes linked to a BMS, for monitoring. In case a fire is detected then only the fire alarm panel could shut off dampers in the ventilation system to stop smoke spreading and send all the elevators to the ground floor and park them to prevent people from using them.

  • Illumination (lighting) control
  • Electric power control
  • Heating, Ventilation and Air-conditioning (HVAC)
  • Security and observation
  • Access control
  • Fire alarm system
  • Lifts, elevators etc.
  • Plumbing
  • Closed-circuit television (CCTV)
  • Other engineering systems
  • Control Panel
  • PA system
  • Alarm Monitor
  • Security Automation
EMS (Energy Management System)

An energy management system (EMS) is a system of computer-aided tools used by operators of electric utility grids to monitor, control, and optimize the performance of the generation and/or transmission system. The monitor and control functions are known as SCADA; the optimization packages are often referred to as "advanced applications".

The computer technology is also referred to as SCADA/EMS or EMS/SCADA. In these respects, the terminology EMS then excludes the monitoring and control functions, but more specifically refers to the collective suite of power network applications and to the generation control and scheduling applications.

Manufacturers of EMS also commonly supply a corresponding dispatcher training simulator (DTS). This related technology makes use of components of SCADA and EMS as a training tool for control center operators. It is also possible to acquire an independent DTS from a non-EMS source such as EPRI.

Energy management systems are also often commonly used by individual commercial entities to monitor, measure, and control their electrical building loads. Energy management systems can be used to centrally control devices like HVAC units and lighting systems across multiple locations, such as retail, grocery and restaurant sites. Energy management systems can also provide metering, sub-metering, and monitoring functions that allow facility and building managers to gather data and insight that allows them to make more informed decisions about energy activities across their sites.

 
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